Database release:
SDF
NATURA 2000 - STANDARD DATA FORM

For Special Protection Areas (SPA),
Proposed Sites for Community Importance (pSCI),
Sites of Community Importance (SCI) and
for Special Areas of Conservation (SAC)

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. SITE IDENTIFICATION

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1.1 Type

B

1.2 Site code

IE0001482

1.3 Site name

Clew Bay Complex SAC

1.4 First Compilation date

2001-10

1.5 Update date

2021-10

1.6 Respondent:

Name/Organisation:National Parks and Wildlife Service, Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht
Address:               
Email:datadelivery@chg.gov.ie

1.7 Site indication and designation / classification dates

Date site proposed as SCI:2002-01
Date site confirmed as SCI: No information provided
Date site designated as SAC: No information provided
National legal reference of SAC designation: No information provided

2. SITE LOCATION

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2.1 Site-centre location [decimal degrees]:

Longitude:-9.652941
Latitude:53.852307

2.2 Area [ha]

11981.9388

2.3 Marine area [%]

85.2290

2.4 Sitelength [km] (optional):


No information provided

2.5 Administrative region code and name

NUTS level 2 code Region Name
IE01Border, Midland and Western

2.6 Biogeographical Region(s)

Atlantic (0.00 %)

3. ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION

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3.1 Habitat types present on the site and assessment for them

Annex I Habitat types Site assessment
Code PF NP Cover [ha] Cave [number] Data quality A|B|C|D A|B|C
      RepresentativityRelative SurfaceConservationGlobal
1140  info      1276.87  0.00 
1150  info      163.302  0.00 
1160  info      10188.5  0.00 
1210  info      0.1176  0.00 
1220  info      0.489  0.00 
1330  info      38.8597  0.00 
2110  info      1.4015  0.00 
2120  info      0.5447  0.00 
21A0  info  X     33.74  0.00 
91A0  info      119.87  0.00 
  • PF: for the habitat types that can have a non-priority as well as a priority form (6210, 7130, 9430) enter "X" in the column PF to indicate the priority form.
  • NP: in case that a habitat type no longer exists in the site enter: x (optional)
  • Cover: decimal values can be entered
  • Caves: for habitat types 8310, 8330 (caves) enter the number of caves if estimated surface is not available.
  • Data quality: G = 'Good' (e.g. based on surveys); M = 'Moderate' (e.g. based on partial data with some extrapolation); P = 'Poor' (e.g. rough estimation)

3.2 Species referred to in Article 4 of Directive 2009/147/EC and listed in Annex II of Directive 92/43/EEC and site evaluation for them

Species Population in the site Site assessment
G Code Scientific Name S NP T Size Unit Cat. D.qual. A|B|C|D A|B|C
      MinMax  Pop.Con.Iso.Glo.
BA052Anas crecca    127  127   
BA050Anas penelope    112  112   
BA053Anas platyrhynchos    64  64   
BA169Arenaria interpres    27  27   
BA046Branta bernicla    118  118   
BA045Branta leucopsis    150  150   
BA149Calidris alpina    450  450   
BA137Charadrius hiaticula    142  142   
BA003Gavia immer    14  14   
BA130Haematopus ostralegus    250  250   
BA157Limosa lapponica    73  73   
M1355Lutra lutra          DD 
BA070Mergus merganser    70  70   
BA160Numenius arquata    373  373   
BA017Phalacrocorax carbo    115  115   
M1365Phoca vitulina    95  95   
BA195Sterna albifrons     
BA193Sterna hirundo    20  20   
BA194Sterna paradisaea    100  100   
BA048Tadorna tadorna    74  74   
BA164Tringa nebularia    10  10   
BA162Tringa totanus    172  172   
I1013Vertigo geyeri          DD       
  • Group: A = Amphibians, B = Birds, F = Fish, I = Invertebrates, M = Mammals, P = Plants, R = Reptiles
  • S: in case that the data on species are sensitive and therefore have to be blocked for any public access enter: yes
  • NP: in case that a species is no longer present in the site enter: x (optional)
  • Type: p = permanent, r = reproducing, c = concentration, w = wintering (for plant and non-migratory species use permanent)
  • Unit: i = individuals, p = pairs or other units according to the Standard list of population units and codes in accordance with Article 12 and 17 reporting (see reference portal)
  • Abundance categories (Cat.): C = common, R = rare, V = very rare, P = present - to fill if data are deficient (DD) or in addition to population size information
  • Data quality: G = 'Good' (e.g. based on surveys); M = 'Moderate' (e.g. based on partial data with some extrapolation); P = 'Poor' (e.g. rough estimation); VP = 'Very poor' (use this category only, if not even a rough estimation of the population size can be made, in this case the fields for population size can remain empty, but the field "Abundance categories" has to be filled in)

3.3 Other important species of flora and fauna (optional)

Species

Population in the site

Motivation

Group CODE Scientific Name S NP Size Unit Cat. Species Annex Other categories
     MinMax C|R|V|PIVVABCD
Allomelita pellucida                     
Anitides rosea                     
Ardea cinerea    24  24             
Clymenura clypeata                     
Clypterea chinensis                     
Conopeum seurati                     
Hammarbya paludosa                     
Jaera ischiosetosa                     
Jaera nordmanni                     
Lekanesphaera hookeri                     
Lembos longipes                     
Leptocheirus pilosus                     
Lucernariopsis cruxmelitensis                     
Megasternum obscurum                     
Neomysis integer                     
Palaemonetes varians                     
Pterosyllis formosa                     
  • Group: A = Amphibians, B = Birds, F = Fish, Fu = Fungi, I = Invertebrates, L = Lichens, M = Mammals, P = Plants, R = Reptiles
  • CODE: for Birds, Annex IV and V species the code as provided in the reference portal should be used in addition to the scientific name
  • S: in case that the data on species are sensitive and therefore have to be blocked for any public access enter: yes
  • NP: in case that a species is no longer present in the site enter: x (optional)
  • Unit: i = individuals, p = pairs or other units according to the standard list of population units and codes in accordance with Article 12 and 17 reporting, (see reference portal)
  • Cat.: Abundance categories: C = common, R = rare, V = very rare, P = present
  • Motivation categories: IV, V: Annex Species (Habitats Directive), A: National Red List data; B: Endemics; C: International Conventions; D: other reasons

4. SITE DESCRIPTION

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4.1 General site character

Habitat class % Cover
N0162.00
N0219.00
N031.00
N043.00
N053.00
N061.00
N072.00
N083.00
N093.00
N102.00
N161.00

Total Habitat Cover

100

Other Site Characteristics

Clew Bay is a wide, west facing, bay on the west coast. It is open to the Atlantic westerly swells and winds, with Clare Island giving only a small amount of protection. Geomorphologically, the bay is a classic example of a drowned drumlin landscape, with numerous small islands which have been created since the last glacial period. The geomorphology of the bay has also resulted in a complex series of interlocking bays creating a wide variety of marine and terrestrial habitats. The shores of the drumlin islands and the inner part of the bay are a mixture of boulders, cobbles, pebbles and gravel, but there are extensive areas of intertidal sand and mud flats. Lough Furnace, a large, deep, stratified saline lake lagoon, is included in the site, along with some of the surrounding area of bog and heath.

4.2 Quality and importance

The geomorphological structure of this bay is unique in Ireland. This site is important as it has a good range of representative shallow bay communities reflecting the range of sediment types from boulders and cobbles on mixed sediment to mud and maerl beds. A number of marine species were recorded from this bay that were not recorded at any other site during the BioMar survey. The site includes a large area of tidal mud/sand flats. Clew Bay has the most significant shingle reserves in the country, and has the only examples of incipient gravel barriers in Ireland. Associated with the shingle (and dunes) are excellent examples of annual vegetation of drift lines. Atlantic salt meadows are very well represented throughout the site and two dune systems also occur. Lough Furnace is a good example (and one of the largest in the country) of a deep, stratified saline lake lagoon in a natural state, of which there are very few in Ireland. A fine stand of old oak woodland occurs within the site near Newport. The legally protected plant Hammarbya paludosa occurs within site and there is a large population of Erica erigena around Lough Furnace. The site has important resident populations of Lutra lutra and Phoca vitulina. The site also includes a population of Vertigo geyeri. The relict mysid Neomysis integer occurs in Lough Furance. Clew Bay is a traditional breeding site for Sterna hirundo, Sterna paradisaea and Sterna albifrons, and has a breeding colony of Phalacrocorax carbo. The bay supports a range of wintering waterfowl, with nationally important populations of Branta leucopsis, Mergus merganser and Charadrius hiaticula.

4.3 Threats, pressures and activities with impacts on the site

The most important impacts and activities with high effect on the site

Negative Impacts
RankThreats and pressures [code]Pollution (optional) [code]inside/outside [i|o|b]
MA08i
LA10i
MBo
MC01.01i
MDi
LD01.05i
LD02i
MD03.01i
MD03.01.02i
HEb
HF01i
MF03.01i
MF06i
HG01.01i
LG01.01.01i
LG01.01.02i
LG01.02b
MG05.05i
MHo
MJ02.04.01b
HK01.01i
HL07i
Positive Impacts
RankActivities, management [code]Pollution (optional) [code]inside/outside [i|o|b]
HA04i
MA04i
LF02.03i
HG02.09i

Rank: H = high, M = medium, L = low
Pollution: N = Nitrogen input, P = Phosphor/Phosphate input, A = Acid input/acidification,
T = toxic inorganic chemicals, O = toxic organic chemicals, X = Mixed pollutions
i = inside, o = outside, b = both

4.4 Ownership (optional)


No information provided

4.5 Documentation (optional)

Aquafact International. (1999). A Survey of Selected Littoral and Sublittoral Sites in Clew Bay. A report to Dúchas - The Heritage Service, Department of Arts, Heritage, Gaeltacht and the Islands, Dublin.DeBurgh, M. and J. Smart. (1969). Report on the hydrography of Lough Furnace and its planktonic and littoral organisms. Ann. Rep. Salmon Res. Trust of Ireland. No. 15 appendix 1, 35-47.Colhoun, K. (2001). I-WeBS Report 1998-99. BirdWatch Ireland, Dublin. Costello, M.J., Holmes, J.M.C., McGrath, D. and Myers, A.A.. (1989). A review and catalogue of the Amphipoda (Crustacea) in Ireland. Irish Fisheries Investigaiton Series B (Marine) 33: 1-70.Cronin, M., Duck, C., Ó Cadhla, O., Nairn, R., Strong, D. and O'Keeffe, C. (2004). Harbour seal population assessment in the Republic of Ireland: August 2003. Irish Wildlife Manuals No. 11. National Parks & Wildlife Service, Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government., 7 Ely Place, Dublin 2, Ireland. 34 pp.Cronin, M., Duck, C., Ó Cadhla, O., Nairn, R., Strong, D. and O'Keeffe, C. (2007). An assessment of harbour seal population size and distribution in the Republic of Ireland during the 2003 moult season. J. Zool. Lond. 273 Issue 2: 131-139.Curtis, T.G.F. (1991). A site inventory of the sandy coasts of Ireland. In Quigley, M.B. (ed.). A Guide to the Sand Dunes of Ireland. E.U.C.C., Dublin. Curtis, T.G.F. and Sheehy Skeffington, M.J. (1998). The salt marshes of Ireland: an inventory and account of their geographical variation. Biology and the Environment, Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy 98B: 87-104.Foss, P.J., Doyle, G.J. and Nelson, E.C. (1987). The distribution of Erica erigena R. Ross in Ireland. Watsonia 16: 311-327. Gaynor, K. and Browne, A. (1999). Survey of Irish Links Golf Courses. Unpublished report for Dúchas, The Heritage Service, Dublin. Good, J.A. (1999). Irish Coastal Lagoon Survey, 1998. Vol V. Dúchas, The Heritage Service, Dublin. .Good, J.A. and Butler, F.T. (1998). Coastal lagoon shores as a habitat for Staphylinidae and Carabidae (Coleoptera) in Ireland. Bulletin of the Irish Biogeographical Society 21: 21-26.Goss-Custard, S., Jones, J., Kitching, J.A. and Norton, T.A. (1979). Tide pools of Carrigathorna and Barloge Creek. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. Series B. Biological Sciences 287: 1-44.Hannon, C., Berrow, S.D. and Newton S.F. (1997). The status and distribution of breeding Sandwich Sterna sandvicensis, Roseate S. dougallii, Common S. hirundo, Arctic S. paradisaea and Little Terns S. albifrons in Ireland in 1995. Irish Birds 6: 1-22.Harrington, R. (1990). 1989 survey of breeding herds of common seal Phoca vitulina with reference to previous surveys. Report to the National Parks & Wildlife Service. 10pp.Hatch, P. and Healy, B. (1998). Aquatic vegetation of Irish coastal lagoons. Bulletin of the Irish Biogeographical Society 21: 2-21.Healy, B. (1999). Irish Coastal Lagoon Survey, 1998. Vol. I, Part I. Background, Description and Summary of the 1996 and 1998 surveys. Dúchas, The Heritage Service, Dublin. Healy, B. and Oliver, G.A. (1998). Irish coastal lagoons: summary of a survey. Bulletin of the Irish Biogeographical Society 21: 116-151.Healy, B., Oliver, G.A., Hatch, P. and Good, G.A. (1997). Coastal Lagoons in the Republic of Ireland. Vol 2. Inventory of Lagoons and Saline Lakes. Report to the National Parks and Wildlife Service, Dublin.Lloyd, C. (1982). Inventory of Seabird Breeding Colonies in Republic of Ireland. Unpublished report, Forestry and Wildlife Service, Dublin.Lockley, R.M. (1966). The distribution of grey and common seals on the coasts of Ireland. The Irish Naturalists' Journal 15: 136-143. Lyons, D.O. (2004). Summary of National Parks & Wildlife Service surveys for common (harbour) seals (Phoca vitulina) and grey seals (Halichoerus grypus), 1978 to 2003. Irish Wildlife Manuals No. 13. National Parks & Wildlife Service, Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government, 7 Ely Place, Dublin 2, Ireland. 67pp.Merne, O.J. (1989) Important bird areas in the Republic of Ireland. In: Grimmett, R.F.A. and Jones, T.A.(eds). Important Bird Areas in Europe. ICBP Technical Publication No. 9, Cambridge. Moore, D. and Wilson, F. (1999). National Shingle Beach Survey of Ireland 1999. Unpublished report to National Parks and Wildlife Service, Dublin.Murphy, K.P. and Fairley, J.S. (1985b). Food and sprainting places of otters on the west coast of Ireland. The Irish Naturalists' Journal 21: 477-479. Oliver, G.A. (1999). Irish Coastal Lagoon Survey. 1998. Vol. IV. Aquatic fauna. Dúchas, The Heritage Service, Dublin. Oliver, G.A. and Healy, B. (1998). Records of aquatic fauna from coastal lagoons in Ireland. Bulletin of the Irish Biogeographical Society 21: 66-115.Parker, M.M. (1977). Lough Furnace, Co. Mayo: Physical and Chemical Studies of an Irish Saline Lake with Reference to the Biology of Neomysis integer. Ph.D. Thesis, Dublin University.Parker, M. and West, A.B. (1978). The natural history on Neomysis integer (Leach) in Lough Furnace, Co. Mayo, a brackish lough in the west of Ireland. Estuarine and Coastal Marine Science 8: 157-167.Picton, B.E. (1985). Anthozoans (Coelenterata: Anthozoa) new to Ireland and new records of some rarely recorded species. The Irish Naturalists' Journal 21: 484-488.Poole, W.R. (1994). A Population Study of the European Eel (Anguilla anguilla (L.)) in the Burrishoole System, Ireland, with Special Reference to Growth and Movement. Ph.D. Thesis, Dublin University.Praeger, R.L. (1934). The Botanist in Ireland. Hodges, Figgis and Co., Dublin.Roden, C. (1999). Irish Coastal Lagoon Survey, 1998. Vol. III, Dúchas, The Heritage Service, Dublin. Sheppard, R. (1993). Ireland's Wetland Wealth. IWC, Dublin. Southern, R. (1914). Archiannelida and Polychaeta. Clare Island Survey, Part 47. Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy 31B: 1-160.Southern, R. (1915). Marine Ecology. Clare Island Survey, Part 67. Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy Volume 31B: 67-110.Summers, C.F., Warner, P.J., Nairn R.G.W., Curry, M.G. and Flynn, J. (1980). An assessment of the status of the common seal (Phoca vitulina vitulina) in Ireland. Biological Conservation 17: 115-123. Walsh, A. and Merne, O.J. (1988). Barnacle Geese in Ireland, spring 1988. Irish Birds 3: 539-550. Warner, P. (1983). An assessment of the breeding populations of common seal (Phoca vitulina vitulina L.) in the Republic of Ireland during 1979. The Irish Naturalists' Journal 21: 24-26. Warner, P. (1984). Report on the Census of Common Seals (Phoca vitulina vitulina) in the Republic of Ireland during 1984. Unpublished document to the Forest and Wildlife Service, Dublin.Whilde, A. (1985). The All Ireland Tern Survey 1984. Unpublished report for the Irish Wildbird Conservancy, Dublin. Wyse Jackson, P.N. (1991). Distribution of Irish marine Bryozoa, together with biographical notes relating to the chief researchers in the group. Bulletin of the Irish Biogeographical Society 14: 129-184.

5. SITE PROTECTION STATUS

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6. SITE MANAGEMENT

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6.1 Body(ies) responsible for the site management:


No information provided

6.2 Management Plan(s):

An actual management plan does exist:

Yes
No, but in preparation
X
No

6.3 Conservation measures (optional)


No information provided

 

7. MAP OF THE SITE

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INSPIRE ID:IE.NPWS.PS.NATURA2000.SAC.IE0001482
Map delivered as PDF in electronic format (optional)
Yes
X
No

SITE DISPLAY